Content of review 1, reviewed on May 30, 2018

Dr. Hemida et al. present to us a very meticulous paper about "Dromedary Camels and the Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)" with an excellent clinical analysis of the findings obtained from qualitatively studying reported research data as well as recorded research papers. No doubt that the topic serves the MENA academic and medical communities at large who are following on "epidemiology of MERS". However, the authors did not relate at the end of their research to recommendations and implications to create preventive measures, to create awareness campaigns, or other neither proposed to policy makers what to do about it. Prodiving information is just one option [in this case for other researchers only/], and knowing that the degree of infection as the authors contend is some how "naturally controlled' because "Heterogeneity of human susceptibility to MERS-CoV infection may be one possible explanation, as also proposed for avian influenza H5N1." The question that should be answered is : What is Next?

Source

    © 2018 the Reviewer (CC BY 4.0).

References

    G., H. M., A., E., F., A., A., A., F., A., B., F., W., C. D. K., M., P. R. A. P., M., P. 2017. Dromedary Camels and the Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Transboundary and Emerging Diseases.