Institution

University of Exeter

Reviewers: 74

26th in United Kingdom

Reviews: 1626

13th in United Kingdom

Merit: 4949

12th in United Kingdom

Openness: 6.0

14th in United Kingdom

Journal Editors at University of Exeter

Reviewers from University of Exeter

  • Reviewer

    Erik Postma

    I combine ideas and techniques from the fields of evolutionary biology and quantitative genetics to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary processes responsible for the generation and maintenance of the ubiquitous levels of diversity we see around us, both among individuals and populations. I try to disentangle the relative role of genes and the environment in shaping this variation, as well as to quantify the strength and shape of selection acting upon it.

  • Reviewer

    David Studholme

    I am a bioinformatician with an interest in plant pathology and protection/improvement of crops.

  • Reviewer

    David Studholme

    I am a bioinformatician with an interest in plant pathology and protection/improvement of crops.

  • Reviewer

    Gáspár Jékely

    ■ since 2017 Professor for Neuroscience, Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter ■ 2007-2017 Group leader at MPI for Developmental Biology, Germany ■ 2004-2007 Postdoctoral fellow at EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany ■ 2003-2004 Junior fellow at Collegium Budapest, Institute for Advanced Study, Budapest, Hungary ■ 2000-2002 Postdoctoral fellow at EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany ■ PhD 1999 Genetics, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

  • Reviewer

    Jacopo Bertolotti

    Lecturer in Physics at the University of Exeter (UK)

  • Reviewer

    Kees Jan van Groenigen

    I'm a biogeochemist. Through my research, I try to increase understanding of how plants and soil respond to and influence environmental change. I have studied carbon and nutrient cycles in a wide range of ecosystems, including grasslands, cropland, temperate forests and rice paddies. I often use meta-analytic techniques to synthesize findings in my field of research. I also study the role of soil microbes in carbon and nitrogen cycles, using techniques such as incubation experiments, isotopic tracers and analyses of biomarkers.

  • Reviewer

    Richard B Sherley

    I am a Research Associate with the Bristol Zoological Society, seconded to the Environment and Sustainability Institute at the University of Exeter.

    I try to understand the impacts of anthropogenic and environmental change in marine ecosystems by studying the conservation biology and population ecology of seabirds. More broadly, I'm interested in how the conditions that animals experience during development may influence later fitness, how to consider life-history strategies in conservation and how technology can assist our efforts to understand animal ecology by creating minimally-invasive solutions to gather ecological data.