Institution

University of Exeter

Reviewers: 64

23rd in United Kingdom

Reviews: 1209

13th in United Kingdom

Merit: 3610

11th in United Kingdom

Openness: 3.8

27th in United Kingdom

Journal Editors at University of Exeter

Reviewers from University of Exeter

  • Reviewer

    David Studholme

    I am a bioinformatician with an interest in plant pathology and protection/improvement of crops.

  • Reviewer

    David Studholme

    I am a bioinformatician with an interest in plant pathology and protection/improvement of crops.

  • Reviewer

    Jacopo Bertolotti

    Lecturer in Physics at the University of Exeter (UK)

  • Reviewer

    Kees Jan van Groenigen

    I'm a biogeochemist. Through my research, I try to increase understanding of how plants and soil respond to and influence environmental change. I have studied carbon and nutrient cycles in a wide range of ecosystems, including grasslands, cropland, temperate forests and rice paddies. I often use meta-analytic techniques to synthesize findings in my field of research. I also study the role of soil microbes in carbon and nitrogen cycles, using techniques such as incubation experiments, isotopic tracers and analyses of biomarkers.

  • Reviewer

    Harry H Marshall

    Broadly, I am interested in how aspects of social behavior evolved and are maintained in animal groups, and the implications of this for social species' conservation and management.

    I am currently working as a post-doc on a project investigating the evolution of cooperative behaviour in animal societies which is using the University of Exeter's Banded Mongoose Research Project as its study system.

  • Reviewer

    Claudio Vergari

    Current research interests

    My main interest in research is the biomechanical characterization of soft tissue. It is a fascinating field since it couples experimental engineering and medical issues. In particular, I specialize on the development and application of novel techniques to investigate soft tissue mechanical properties. For instance, during my PhD I worked on a technique based on quantitative ultrasound to non-invasively measure the force applied to superficial tendons, as well as their elastic modulus. More recently, I worked with ultrasound elastography to non-invasively assess intervertebral disc properties. Currently, I am applying nonlinear microscopy techniques to investigate needle injury to the intervertebral disc.

  • Reviewer

    Richard B Sherley

    I am a Research Associate with the Bristol Zoological Society, seconded to the Environment and Sustainability Institute at the University of Exeter.

    I try to understand the impacts of anthropogenic and environmental change in marine ecosystems by studying the conservation biology and population ecology of seabirds. More broadly, I'm interested in how the conditions that animals experience during development may influence later fitness, how to consider life-history strategies in conservation and how technology can assist our efforts to understand animal ecology by creating minimally-invasive solutions to gather ecological data.